No grasping or resistance

Ajahn Buddhadasa, a colleague of Ajahn Chah, made a point of directing his students to look for nirvana in the simplest ways, in everyday moments. “Nirvana,” he would say, “is the coolness of letting go, the inherent delight of experience when there is no grasping or resistance to life. It is always available. Anyone can see that if grasping and aversion were with us day and night without ceasing, who could ever stand them? Instead we survive because there are natural periods of coolness, of wholeness and ease…In fact, they last longer than the fires of our grasping and fear. It is this that sustains us. We have periods of rest making us refreshed and well. Why don’t we feel thankful for this everyday nirvana?” 

Jack Kornfield, The Wise Heart, Buddhist Psychology for the West.

Separateness

The heart is just the heart; thoughts and feelings are just thoughts and feelings. Let things be just as they are! Let form be just form, let sound be just sound, let thought be just thought….If we think and feel in this way, then there is detachment and separateness. Our thoughts and feelings will be on one side and our heart will be on the other. Just like oil and water – they are in the same bottle but they are separate.

Ajahn Chah, Food for the Heart

Circles and figures of eight

Our life is an apprenticeship to the truth, that around every circle another can be drawn;

that there is no end in nature, but every end is a beginning; 

that there is always another dawn risen on mid-noon,

and under every deep a lower deep opens.

Ralph Waldo Emerson,  Circles