Small forgotten miracles

“It is believed that the onion originally came from India. 
In Egypt it was an object of worship — why I haven’t been able to find out. From Egypt the onion entered Greece and on to Italy, thence into all of Europe.” 
Better Living Cookbook 
 

When I think how far the onion has traveled
just to enter my stew today, I could kneel and praise
all small forgotten miracles,
crackly paper peeling on the drainboard,
pearly layers in smooth agreement,
the way the knife enters onion
and onion falls apart on the chopping block,
a history revealed.
And I would never scold the onion
for causing tears.
It is right that tears fall
for something small and forgotten.
How at meal, we sit to eat,
commenting on texture of meat or herbal aroma
but never on the translucence of onion,
now limp, now divided,
or its traditionally honorable career:
For the sake of others,
disappear.

Naomi Shihab Nye

Living in our heads

The Pueblo Indian told me that all Americans were always uneasy and restless, “We do not understand them. We think that they are mad” Of course I was somewhat astonished and asked them why. They said – Well, ‘They say that they think with their heads . . . . We think here,’ he said, indicating his heart

Carl Jung, on his encounter with a Native American elder he met in New Mexico in 1925

 

 

Fear keeps us chattering

Healing depends on listening with the inner ear – stopping the incessant blather, and listening. Fear keeps us chattering – fear that wells up from the past, fear of blurting out what we really fear, fear of future repercussions. It is our very fear of the future that distorts the now that could lead to a different future if we dared to be whole in the present.

Marion Woodman, 1928 – 2018, Canadian author and analytical psychologist, The Pregnant Virgin

Where to look

 

Without stepping out the door, one can know the world.

Without looking out of the window
One can see the way of heaven.
The further one goes
The less one knows.
Therefore:

The wise person knows without having to stir,
perceives without having to see,
Accomplishes without having to act.

Lao Tzu Tao Te Ching,  chapter 47